Aftermarket Auto Warranties Can Cover Wear And Tear Parts On Your Car

Usually motorists buy an aftermarket auto warranty or an extended auto warranty for their cars when their factory warranty is terminated. When you buy an aftermarket auto warranty, your car warranty provider will cover the cost or replacement and repair on certain parts of your car. There are things to keep in mind when you consider buying and aftermarket or extended auto warranty:

An aftermarket auto warranty generally does not cover the cost of replacement or repair of wear and tear parts. An aftermarket bumper to bumper warranty covers almost all parts of your car, but will generally exclude parts such as brakes and tires the break down as a result of wear and tear. However, there are companies out there that will cover wear and tear parts in addition to the other parts. It is smart to buy a warranty that covers wear and tear, even if it is a bit more expensive to do so because 80% of the problems that arise in your car are a result of wear and tear. An auto warranty that covers wear and tear problems will save you a lot of money in the long run, particularly if your car is an older one.

An Auto Warranty Can Help You Avoid Paying Unnecessary Car Costs

Motorists tend to become obsessed with their cars. They wash and wax them constantly to keep them looking brand new. Even though we love our cars so much, it is still important to not pay unnecessary car costs. Here are some things that you may be wasting your money on:

1. It is not always a necessity to fill your tank with premium gasoline. Regular gasoline is cheaper and if it does not cause engine knock, then it is okay to use. The purpose of octane grades is to avoid engine knock. Therefore, if regular gasoline does not cause engine knock, it is okay to use in your tank.

2. Usually car manufacturers advise getting an oil change done on your car every 5,000 to 7,000 miles. However, some motorists think that it is a necessity to get it done every 3,000 miles. This is only a necessity if you are very hard on your car.

3. Lastly, motorists will waste money getting car repairs done by a dealer. Independent shops can do a great job and at a cheaper price. Having an auto warranty can help you save money on maintenance and repairs.

It is good to know where you are wasting money on your car so that you can break those habits and be a bit nicer to your wallet. Do not let other people talk you into paying for car costs that are not a necessity.

5 Tips to Avoid Surprise Bills

 

Most of us know by now that our medical care will cost a lot less if we see a doctor who participates in our health plan’s network.

But it’s gotten harder to know for certain which doctors participate and which don’t, particularly if you’re hospitalized. For example, if you visit the emergency room you likely won’t know if the doctors treating you are in your plan’s network. Even if you have surgery or deliver a baby at an in-network hospital, you could be treated by an anesthesiologist or an assistant surgeon who is not contracted with your insurer.

Even if your insurer reimburses out-of-network doctors, the doctor you saw may decide the payment wasn’t enough, and send you a bill for the balance.

That’s when surprise bills show up. According to a recent report by Consumers Union, nearly one-third of Americans with private insurance got a surprise medical bill in the last two years.

So, if you’re planning a surgery or procedure, consider these 5 steps to reduce your risk of getting surprise bills:

1. Know what your plan covers. Surprise bills can often be avoided by simply taking the time to carefully read through your plan’s benefits and by calling your insurer to ask whether the procedure you need is covered.

2. Get the names of your providers. “You should have a firm understanding not only of what is involved in the procedure you’ll be having, but who will be involved in providing your care,” says Dr. Sam Ho, chief medical officer for UnitedHealthcare.

Get in writing the names of all the healthcare professionals providing your care and make sure they are all in the network, including physician assistants, anesthesiologists, and radiologists. “You have the right to request only in-network providers,” Ho says.

3. Call about your health plan. Provider networks change all the time. Before your procedure, get in touch with your health plan to verify that the doctors you plan to see are still in-network, and be sure to take notes on who you spoke with and what you were told. If you receive an unexpected bill after your procedure, contact your health plan again for assistance.

“Some insurers will serve as an advocate on your behalf and negotiate with the physicians to either lower the out-of-network charges or waive them all together,” Ho says.

4. Ask about cost. There are a number of pricing tools available today that can help you research the estimated cost of specific treatments and procedures. Most insurers offer price estimate tools, as do many large employers. There are also plenty of apps and websites available.

Keep in mind, however, that there is no comprehensive database of healthcare prices.
And, despite all the tools, finding accurate healthcare cost information is still generally difficult.

Still, it pays to talk with your physician and/or the hospital about the cost of your care and to request an estimate in advance.

If you receive a surprise bill, ask if your provider will accept your health plan’s payment as payment in full.

5. Know your state’s rules. Federal law does not protect patients from surprise billing. But some states have policies in place that help people with at least some of the common situations that lead to unexpected charges, such as emergency room visits that involve out-of-network doctors.

If you receive a surprise bill, contact your state’s department of insurance to see if there are legal protections against balance billing.

When It’s Time To Replace Your Transmission, Have An Auto Warranty

One of the most vital parts of your car is your transmission. However, it is one of the most expensive parts of your car to have replaced. If you own your car for a long period of time, there is a good chance that you eventually need to replace the transmission. Here are some clear signs that you are having transmission issues:

One sign is leaking transmission fluid. The fluid pools beneath your car when it is parked and can be easily identified by its red color. You then should check to see if there is any metal in the fluid. If there is metal, a new transmission is essential since broken metal is a sign that your transmission is worn down.

In addition, inspect the fluid levels in your car’s transmission. If they are low, this could be an indication that your transmission is burning too much fluid or overheating.

If you notice that your car is making rough transitions between gears, this is an indication of a transmission problem. Your gears could slip and take a longer time to switch between gears, resulting in a slower acceleration of your car.

Since transmission replacements are expensive, it is smart to look up an aftermarket auto warranty company and purchase an extended auto warranty in order to reduce the costs of your car repair bills. In addition, make sure that you buy an auto warranty that provides the right amount of coverage for your car.

 

5 Home Warranty Myths Debunked

While home warranties can be an additional level of protection for your home, some homeowners may have chosen not to purchase one and others may not even know what one is. If you’re wondering how a home warranty could help protect your home, here are five misconceptions and myths debunked.

Myth #1: “I don’t even know what a home warranty is, so I probably don’t need one.”

The more you know about the home systems and appliances in your home that may be covered by a home warranty, the more you may likely appreciate the value. Home warranties usually cover big-ticket items, like your furnace, air conditioner, plumbing, electrical systems and appliances — some of the essential things you use on a daily basis. A home warranty may help cover the repair or replacement of covered items that break down due to normal wear and tear.

Myth #2: “A home warranty is expensive; it’s not worth it.”

Have you ever thought about how much it would cost if you were to replace a major home system?  According to HomeAdvisor, the average cost of replacing a furnace may range from $2,298 to $5,550. Generally, a basic home warranty may cost you between $350 to $500 a year.

Myth #3: “I don’t need a home warranty, because I have all new appliances.”

Unfortunately, new items may break down, too. Without a warranty, you may be leaving yourself open to a potentially expensive repair on a new appliance.

Myth #4: “I maintain all my appliances and systems, so I would never need a home warranty.”

Breakdowns can happen unexpectedly, even to the most attentive homeowners. Routine maintenance can be a great thing and certainly helps, but it is no guarantee that things may not go wrong.

Myth #5: “I have homeowners insurance, so I don’t need a home warranty.”

This is a common misconception. Homeowners insurance and a home warranty are two separate things and offer different coverage. Homeowners insurance may cover things that happen due to an unexpected event, such as a fire or theft. But a home warranty is a service contract that provides for the repair or replacement of covered items when they break down due to normal wear and tear — things that can happen to just about any homeowner at some point.

Make sure to weigh all of the facts, and then decide if a home warranty may be right for you and your home.